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What is Nearshore?

Nearshore is "the transfer of business or IT processes to companies in a nearby country, often sharing a border with your own country", where both parties expect to benefit from one or more of the following dimensions of proximity: geographic, temporal (time zone), cultural, linguistic, economic, political, or historical linkages.
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About
Analysis and insights regarding the IT outsourcing industry & technology perspectives. Contributors of this blog include journalists of Nearshore Americas and of Softtek. The views expressed in the content by Nearshore Americas, or any other author, do not necessarily reflect the position of Softtek.
Nearshore Outsourcing
Softtek created the nearshore concept in 1997. While the nearshore industry is maturing nicely, there is still room for growth. This space is dedicated to providing our takes and perspectives on nearshoring across the globe.
The Process of Creating
Creativity, while in its essence is free of rules, follows a process. A discussion of the evolution of services, this blog allows us to participate and share our thoughts and ideas more openly during a time of disruptive IT evolution.

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The Process of Creating

(107 posts in this category)

Tim Wilson
Tim Wilson
May 23, 2013 at 12:46 PM
 

In the Internet of Things, every object can be a device

Office-ObjectsOne of the big societal and technological trends we are experiencing today is the shift to an environment where applications are everywhere. In the early going, we can be excused for thinking that the pervasiveness of software applications is reflected in mobile devices. After all, most of us now carry an application-enabled device, and see it as the nexus of mobile application development.

And we’re right, insofar as mobile platforms from iOS, to Android, Windows Phone 8, and BlackBerry, are the sandboxes where the world’s most talented developers are strutting their stuff. Some of these apps are truly disruptive, and are changing the way we live. But where we are headed is an application environment that is far richer than having a bunch of apps on your smartphone – or even the cloud. In the future, every object will have the potential to have an application imbedded in it. As a result, the world will be a whole lot smarter.

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Tim Wilson
Tim Wilson
May 10, 2013 at 12:14 PM
 

In Mexico, mobile payments show potential

A recent report titled “Mobile and Alternative Payments in Mexico” argues that Mexico’s mobile payments industry is on the verge of some significant growth, though uncertainty on the legislative front, as well as cultural and economic challenges, suggest a cautionary view has merit.

Mobile-ImageThe report, from market research firm Packaged Facts, is impressive in its thoroughness. Important findings include the leadership role of Telcel, which is owned by América Móvil, and the fact that all of Mexico’s major banks have ambitious initiatives in place to enable smartphone access.

As a result, Mexico’s banking system could transform itself in short order. The big reason is the penetration of smartphones into consumers’ hands. The report says that the financial system is moving to transform how remittances and branch banking are handled, and that mobile technology has the ability to address regional and demographic disparities.

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Daniel de Souza
Daniel de Souza
April 29, 2013 at 9:30 AM
 

Mercado de TI na América Latina é promissor, diz F&S

MP900400422 (1)O Brasil, há alguns anos, era tido como o moto propulsor do crescimento na América Latina. Muitos países vizinhos, como Argentina, Uruguai, Chile, Peru e Colômbia se beneficiavam da maré positiva da economia do gigante sul-americano, que agora passa a caminhar a passos bem mais lentos. Esses “hermanos”, entretanto, têm conseguido se desenvolver plenamente com seus passos próprios, com boas taxas de desenvolvimento e crescimento – e isso também é válido para o setor de tecnologia da informação (TI) em cada um deles.

A empresa de pesquisa Frost & Sullivan (F&S) informou há poucos dias que o mercado de TI na América Latina (ao se considerar o conjunto de produção de hardware, software e serviços) aumentará 7% ao ano até 2014. A empresa de análise considera que, com a maioria dos países da região em crescimento inferior a 3%, os investimentos na área podem impulsionar o PIB (Produto Interno Bruto) da região como um todo. É uma aposta ousada, mas que faz totalmente sentido.

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Clay Browne
Clay Browne
April 28, 2013 at 10:36 PM
 

Latin American Digital Literacy Gradually Improving

Digital literacy rates, that is, the percent of the population that has regular access to the Internet, hit 80% in North America (U.S. and Canada) in 2013. Worldwide digital literacy rates are thought to approach 40%, with U.N. estimating that close to 50% of the world's population has little to no access to the Internet or even to a computer.

Although the recent trend shows improvement, Latin America continues to lag behind much of the rest of the world in digital literacy rates at just 48%. Not surprisingly, digital literacy rates are especially low in many rural areas. According to the UN's Global Information Technology Report 2013, the reasons for Latin America's laggard status are three-fold. "Although the region is vast and heterogeneous, three shared reasons for this lag can be identified: these countries all exhibit an insufficient investment in developing their ICT infrastructure, a weak skill base in the population because of poor educational systems that hinder society’s capacity to make an effective use of these technologies, and unfavorable business conditions that do not support the spur of entrepreneurship and innovation."

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Clay Browne
Clay Browne
April 20, 2013 at 6:38 PM
 

SMB Security Outsourcing Trend Gains Steam

Larger businesses have been outsourcing aspects of their IT security operations for decades. This had not been the case for smaller businesses until just the last few years. Aside from using third-party network security monitoring services, the large majority of SMBs have relied on their in-house IT teams for almost all of their security needs.

The advent of the cloud, and the growing realization of their vulnerability and the consequences of a security failure among SMB owners and managers, has led to a growing interest in security services among small businesses. According to Symantec’s 2013 Avoiding the Hidden Costs of the Cloud report, more than 90% of SMBs were at least discussing moving some services to the cloud, and over 80% of the 3000+ SMBs surveyed were actively considering email management or security management via the cloud.

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Dan Berthiaume
Dan Berthiaume
April 10, 2013 at 9:03 AM
 

Do You Have IT Awareness?

You might assume that most IT decision-makers have a firm awareness of their IT assets and how those assets are used and provide value to the enterprise. You would be wrong. Kovarus-survey

A recent survey of IT professionals from systems integrator Kovarus, Inc. indicates that less than four in 10 (38%) respondents specifically make their investment decisions based on true alignment and value to the business. This means that for more than six in 10 IT professionals critical decisions are being made without the correct business insight, putting the IT department at a disadvantage with other better-informed business units.

IT Pros Lag in Awareness, Capabilities
The survey also shows that large percentages of IT professionals are lagging not only in awareness of their IT assets, but even of the capabilities to gain awareness. For example, 40% of IT professionals were not aware of their IT assets – a slightly higher percentage than make investment decisions based on actual business value and alignment. Thus a large portion of the IT budgets at these organizations are not allocated for correctly, leading to inflated costs.

Especially as many companies place their IT organizations in open competition with third-party service providers, this type of unnecessarily increased cost can be deadly to the viability of an in-house IT unit.

Furthermore, about two thirds (65%) of survey respondents said that they did not have the time, practices or tools to collect information on the utilization of their IT investments. That is, they did not have the capability of determining performance and capacity used on daily basis. Kovarus advises this situation is especially damaging to virtualization efforts (and who isn’t virtualizing or planning to virtualize systems these days?), as collective capacity needs cannot be determined, which can lead to environments being overconfigured by a factor of as much as 15.

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Daniel de Souza
Daniel de Souza
April 09, 2013 at 9:00 AM
 

Can São Paulo Break Its WiFi Bottleneck?

MP900425290When arriving in São Paulo - the biggest city in Brazil and the economic heart of the country - your smartphone will probably recognize countless Wi-Fi signals. But you'll find most of them are locked and closed - and the ones open might not be very safe to connect to. Many times, when you pay to get a password and connect to one, the quality might not be as good as initially thought.  In other words, Sao Paulo is far from being a WiFi paradise.

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Clay Browne
Clay Browne
April 09, 2013 at 7:54 AM
 

IT Offshoring Trend to Continue through 2020; But Positions Suitable for Offshoring Shrinking

The number of IT employees at larger businesses continues to decline, but there is an end in sight to the multi-decade trend. According to the Hackett Group, the ongoing decline in U.S. and European IT jobs is directly attributable to offshoring, and is probably going to continue for at least the next several years. That said, the IT offshoring trend will likely dry up over the next 10 years as companies run out of jobs suitable for offshoring to low-cost countries.

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Image by USDAgov.

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Daniel de Souza
Daniel de Souza
April 01, 2013 at 7:00 PM
 

Um mercado de profissionais disputados

MP900382667 (1)Mudar de emprego ao longo da carreira de um profissional é normal, válido e necessário. Mas a partir do momento em que mudanças constantes transformam-se em quase rotinas para os empregados e empregadores, entretanto, algo mais pode estar errado. Este pode ser o caso visto atualmente no Brasil.

Segundo a consultoria Hyas Executive, a grande demanda por especialistas em Tecnologia da Informação (TI) e a pouca oferta de profissionais bem qualificados dessa área no maior país da América Latina faz com que estes sejam os profissionais que mais mudam de emprego no país, conforme conta o veículo especializado Computer World.

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Dan Berthiaume
Dan Berthiaume
March 28, 2013 at 10:40 AM
 

Smartphones Change the Game for CIOs

The continuing proliferation of smartphones is changing the game for CIOs. Your employees and customers are most likely connecting to the Internet via smartphone or other mobile device, Mobile-minutesmeaning both internally and externally facing solutions must be adapted and optimized for mobile access.

According to a recent report from comScore, “Mobile Future in Focus 2013,” more than 125 million US consumers have smartphones and more than 50 million now own tablets. As a result, comScore says there is a “new paradigm of digital media fragmentation where consumers are always connected.”

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